Black Women Power: Lucy Parsons

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

The Chicago police labeled her “more dangerous than a thousand rioters.” For almost 70 years, Lucy Parsons fought for the rights of the poor and disenfranchised in the face of an increasingly oppressive industrial economic system. Her radical activism challenged the racist and sexist sentiment in a time when it was assumed that women were biologically determined to stay at home barefoot and pregnant.

Black Women Power: Peggy “Lady Bo” Jones

Source:Google.com

Source:Google.com

Peggy “Lady Bo” Jones One of the first female lead guitarists in rock & roll, Peggy Jones is most notable for her work in Bo Diddley‘s backing band, for which she earned the affectionate — and appropriate — nickname Lady Bo. However, her musical resume is much longer, boasting stints as a doo wop singer and an R/soul bandleader. Born in New York, Jones began her career as a professional dancer.

 

 

The GULLAH/GEECHEE

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

The GULLAH/GEECHEE preserved more of their African cultural heritage than any other group of African Americans. The English spoken by the Gullah slaves was greatly influenced by their native languages of the Fante, Ga, Kikongo, Kimbundu, Mandinka, Twi, Ewe, Ibo and Yorba.

 

Black Women Power: Catherine Burks

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Catherine Burks. Arrested in 1961 as part of the Freedom Righters, activists who entered Southern bus stations, train stations, and airports to challenge state segregation laws.

Black Women Power: Mary Smith

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Mary Smith, one of the first Black Dallas Cowboy cheerleaders, 1970.

 

Black Women Power: Kathleen Cleaver

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Kathleen Cleaver was in charge of organizing a student conference at Fisk University in Nashville, TN. At the conference, Kathleen met the minister of information for the Black Panther Party, Eldridge Cleaver. She moved to San Francisco in November, 1967, to join the Black Panther Party. Kathleen Neal and Eldridge Cleaver were married on December 27, 1967. Cleaver became the communications secretary and the first female member of the Party’s decision-making body.

Black Women Power: Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson became the first woman to earn a license to practice medicine in Alabama.

Black Women Power:Patricia Bath

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Patricia Bath – the first African American woman doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose. Her Laserphaco Probe is used to treat cataracts.

Quote of the day: Mahalia Jackson

Source: Google.com

Source: Google.com

Baby, black promoters oppressed me before white promoters ever got hold of me. Don’t talk skin to me.-Mahalia Jackson